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Welcome to Wildflies.com, and i hope you enjoy the site!

Everything here is my own, the words, images and video, all taken by myself whilst out fishing or spending time in wild places, which is what it's all about in my view! Get out there and enjoy it, or grab a cup of tea, sit down and i'll go for you!...

If you have any questions, queries, comments or would just like to get in touch, feel free to contact me at:

Email: ghamrawson@gmail.com
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Sunday, 4 July 2010

Mixing it up...


A quick report from today...

I had an early start on the river this morning hoping to contact a Pike or two, but on reaching the river my hopes quickly vanished. Most of the spots i had in mind to fish were very low on water and the whole river is not much more than skin and bones at the moment, i ran the popper through a few favoured lies anyway and prospected the deeper pools with my usual streamer pattern but nothing obliged, i think the recent few weeks with the high temp's and lack of fresh water has taken it's toll, fingers crossed for a few days steady drizzle to liven things up...

After putting the 8wt away it was time to have some fun with the 5wt, this is my normal approach for summer fishing on the river, start early for Pike and once the sun is on the water wander around spotting and fishing for whatever comes along!

I Started at the bottom of a favourite stretch where a wide shallow area holds some nice Chub along with most other river species albeit mostly on the small side, there's some nice runs between streamer weed along with the odd depression thrown in to spice things up a bit. I positioned myself downstream of one such depression and watched a few Chub jostling for prime position in the flow, then, just out of the corner of my eye i noticed a striped Sergeant which skulked his way along the edges of the streamer weed, half hidden in the fronds. I clipped off the black beetle which was meant for the chub and quickly tied on a large beadhead damsel, all the time glancing up to keep track of the camouflaged menace, i pitched my fly in a good way ahead of him and let it sink, then bounced it back down the flow towards him in a jerky "eat me" fashion, sure enough he obliged and sucked in the fly as calmly as one can imagine, that was until i raised the rod! He darted to and fro from different beds of streamer weed, desperate to shed his annoyance in the fronds, but after a short but very spirited fight he was safely in the net, where upon he did nothing but splash my lens as i tried to take his portrait, we got there eventually...


A lovely solid fish getting on for a couple of pounds i guess, he shot of very unlike a wounded soldier once free of the mesh, off to pester the Roach no doubt...

Once i'd got back into position again the Chub were back after the disturbance, on went the beetle again(no wonder i get through so much tippet material) and the fly plopped in the middle of the group, three of them rushed for it but the largest got there first, probably why he's the largest! He gave a good "thumping" battle as only Chub do and put a lovely bend in the 5wt, a fish that had obviously got back in condition well after spawning, he also had a quick portrait before he was slipped back to disappear in amongst the weed beds...



I moved further up the river switching to a small beadhead nymph which was plopped in likely places and twitched around, several small Perch attacked it along with a lovely Roach which sadly slipped my hands before i had chance to photograph it, it was now mid morning and the river was well and truly woken up(more than i can say for me!)...


Other anglers started to arrive signalling my move to another stretch, i don't mind being watched by the coarse anglers while they wait for their rod to be dragged in, but i'm not keen on fishing "around" them, it's just easier to move somewhere else, which thankfully isn't a problem with miles of river to go at.

After a short journey in the car i was once again the only one on the river, well i say the only one but of course you're never really alone in a place like this, buzzards wheeled and stooped overhead, Mrs mallard led her brood from one bank to another in attempt to hide them from me, Comma butterflies were very active in the fields amongst the nettles and a pair of swans worked the shallows dredging the tasty bits from the river bed with their beaks...



From a high bank i could easily spot a few small chub, and it would've been rude not to have a quick plop with the beetle, sometimes it's just too easy...


Further downstream the river widened and slowed up a little, there were little rings from time to time just on a crease in the flow, i suspected Dace were the culprits and after having missed the first couple due to not being quick enough i was right. I'd swapped the beetle which is tied on a long shank 8's to a little 16's greenwell's, also i was casting downstream to them as some recent bank alterations made an upstream approach impossible. On the third or fourth take i made contact, the slight jag jag fight meant that i'd not hooked a Bleak but had in fact caught my first Dace of the day, and although there were some much bigger ones there i only managed a few of the same modest size, plus the odd "gatecrasher"...




As i've said before it's not the size but the spirit that's important, and i for one am more than happy to spend a day with our rivers numerous smaller species, i suppose it's an excuse to act like a big kid but i love to try and winkle out fish from tricky little spots no matter what size they are. I spotted some nice Roach in the same place i saw them a fortnight ago, they were mingling with some small Barbel too, but could i fool one? No is the answer.........But every day's a school day and i'll be tying one or two new flies before my next visit...

Here's hoping we get a little rain soon!

Cheers,


Graham

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